Pet Care Info

Pet Care Info

Below is all the information you will need to care for your new pets.
(More coming soon)

Tarantula Care Info

Tarantula Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

General Overview:
Tarantulas come in a variety of colours and sizes in Australia, starting off as a sling at 3-5mm and growing anywhere from 70mm to a huge 220mm as adults depending on Species. Colours vary also depending on species from the more common shades of grey and browns to blacks, they also can have slightly dull colourings of red, yellow & oranges, these aren’t bright colours like new world Tarantulas overseas. Tarantulas in Australia have a more of an aggressive nature compared to others around the world. Overall Tarantulas are a low cost easy Invertebrate to keep that have next to no upkeep.

Food:
Tarantulas can eat a wide variety of insects that can be found readily online and at all good stores. Insects such as Crickets, Woodies, Superworms, Mealworms and Black Soldier Fly Larvae. Adult Tarantulas can also eat things like Pinkie Rats and Mice as well as day old quails. These food items should not be given as part of a regular diet but more as a rare “treat” or after adult female have finished maternally incubating Sacs or if they have been removed from them.

Slings should not be given large prey items, as these can harm, stress or attack the tarantula sling. Food items 1/4 to 1/3 of the slings overall size should be given one at a time and removed if not eaten within a few hours.

Water:
Tarantulas get a lot of what they require from the food they eat, however when misting lightly spraying one of the walls of the terrarium with water, this can give the tarantula something to drink if it wishes. We do not recommend water dishes for Tarantulas however if you wish to have one ensure it’s a small one with shallow water to avoid drowning.

Housing:
Housing can be done as cost effective as $20.00 all the way through to a few hundred dollars depending on how elaborate you are wanting to go. We find here that plastic containers such as Sistema and others found at Bunnings work extremely well. These can be setup in a variety of ways, we here use a substrate mix of 30% Sand (Washed Play Sand from Bunnings) and 70% Coco Peat (Also found at Bunnings). These two mixed together with some corrugated piping in the tub for a hide work well in creating a cost effective enclosure for Tarantulas of all Species.

All our slings come with a home when purchased through us and can be kept in these for up to a year depending on a few factors that can influence growth or slow it down. Species such as Phlogius grow much faster than others like Selenotypus and Selenotholus there for may not be in there as like and can need upgrading within as little as 3-6 months.

Cleaning:
Tarantulas require very little cleaning, as long as their food scraps and any uneaten dead insects are removed there’s no real need to clean their terrariums often. If the substrate becomes mouldy for any reason we suggest removing the portion of mouldy substrate or alternatively you can completely change out the entire terrarium. Cleaning items such as fake plants, hides and water dishes, clean fresh water should be used to soak and clean the items lightly rubbing off any dirt, webbing or faeces.

Heating:
Heating can be utilised in many ways from increasing growth rates of slings to keeping warm in winter. If you are wanting to increase the growth rate of your Tarantula we recommend max heating of 28c this should be regulated by a thermostat. For keeping adult warm in winter 20c is recommended. Heating through warmer season is not recommended or required. At no time should your Tarantula be placed on a window or in direct sunlight.

Handling:
Handling is not recommended due to the risk to the Tarantula if dropped or falls, this is at the keepers risk and should only be done when absolutely necessary.

Mites:
Although not common there may become a time when you get Mites or purchase a Tarantula infested with Mites. We don’t recommend completely changing out the substrate in terrarium, we recommend using Predatory Mites to effectively remove them. Predatory Mites won’t eat the large adult Mites but will eat their eggs and newly hatched Mites. This cleaning process takes about 10-14 days to completely remove any and all Mites, The Predatory mites will then turn on each other when food source (Original Mites) has gone and will disappear themselves 3-5 days later.

Sexing:
While there are many ways to determine sex of a Tarantula, there can be errors made. The most popular ways to sex is sexing through visual inspection of the Pedipalp. Males when they are mature have swollen tarsus segments with red bulbs that are visual.

Scorpion Care Info

Scorpion Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

General Overview:
Scorpions come in a variety of colours ranging from black and dark browns to lighter sandy yellows and oranges, they come in a variety of sizes in ranging from 3-10mm as Scorplings to 17cm as adults depending on species. Keeping is very basic with very little requirements.





Food:
Scorpions can eat a wide variety of insects that can be found readily online and at all good stores. Insects such as Crickets, Woodies, Superworms, Mealworms and Black Soldier Fly Larvae. Items of food should be kept small for scorpions as larger items can be harder to hold and subdue. 



Water:
Scorpions don’t drink water often and usually get what they require from the food they eat, however a dish with Water crystals is the most popular method of hydration across the hobby. Water dishes with water and small rocks filled to the water line is also a great method.



Housing:
Housing can be done as cost effective as $20.00 all the way through to a few hundred dollars depending on how elaborate you are wanting to go. We find here that plastic containers such as Sistema and others found at Bunnings work extremely well. These can be setup in a variety of ways, we here use a substrate mix of 30% Sand (Washed Play Sand from Bunnings) and 70% Coco Peat (Also found at Bunnings). Using small branches or pieces of drift wood make great hides for them to dig under.

Another style of housing widely used is fish tank rocks with either cloth or flyscreen for a barrier with a thick layer of straight sand above. A piece of tube with a removable cap to block off the top to stop scorpions climbing down is placed down the back corner, so that a small amount of water can be fed to the bottom and rise up through the rocks and into the sand. This is an ideal method for burrowing type scorpions like Desert Scorpions.



Most scorpions can’t be housed together although there are a few communal species that will tolerate being housed together, it’s best to check with us on a species case basis to find if you can keep them together.



Cleaning:
Scorpions require very little cleaning, as long as their food scraps and any uneaten dead insects are removed there’s no real need to clean their terrariums often. Cleaning items such as fake plants, hides and water dishes, clean fresh water should be used to soak and clean the items lightly rubbing off any dirt or faeces.



Heating:
Not required for scorpions but can be used through winter is desired. A thermostat is best to be used on a 5W heat mate to regulate to a 20c Temperature gradient.

Handling: Handling is possible with Scorpions but should be done safely and low to the ground or over a table. Best and by far the easiest species to handle for beginners is the Flinders Ranges Scorpion, while some species like the Desert Scorpion can be difficult due to aggression and should be done by experienced keepers.



Sexing:
Sexing Scorpions can be easy with some having sexual dimorphic differences, where others tend to be difficult requiring inspection of the Pectines. Males having longer Pectines then females. Using a zip lock bag can be the easiest way to safely inspect them with a magnifying glass.

Cricket Care Info

Cricket Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

How To Maintain Tubs:

Maintaining tubs of crickets and extending the life of them out as far as possible, can easily be achieved without spending huge amounts of money at your local store. With a few key simple steps you can easily extend the life of your crickets by weeks.



Often Crickets will die quickly with store bought tubs due to the lack of protein available to them to eat, using high protein products like Insect Booster and Vetafarm Herpagrub you can not only keep them full but you can also gut load them for feeding to you Reptiles and Invertebrates. High quality dry cat and dog biscuits can be used although require to be blended to a powder prior to feeding.


Hydration is a big issue too, and while pieces of fresh carrots and lettuce are provided in the tubs, they do not last long and require to be regularly replaced every few days. You can easily use scrap veggies from each night’s dinner to offer a refreshed hydration source, items like carrot peelings and broccoli stems are great. For a great longer lasting product to use that won’t cost much is Pisces Aquaload, it will last each tub roughly a week and can easily be reused for new tubs, if not totally eaten before your tubs of crickets run out. Aquaload is jam packed with vitamin C and calcium which is great for your insects and even better for your Reptiles and Invertebrates. 



Lastly heat can be a huge help as cold crickets often die, they require good heat to stay active and the body working. Placing your crickets over the top of your enclosures or terrariums near the heat source can provide them much needed heat to stay active.



How To Maintain Bulk:
Bulk crickets can be a cost effect way of ordering you crickets for larger collections and easy to maintain.



Feeding 1000s of hungry Crickets is exactly the same as smaller tubs using products like Insect Booster, Herpagrub and Bulk Insect Feeder Food. This is a must as without this high protein food to eat they can often turn on each other for a food source, eating the legs of other crickets and then the helpless crickets are eventually eaten altogether. This creates stress in the within the tub and can lead to devastation as they cannibalise throughout. Most common methods are to place in food dish or scattered throughout the bottom of the tub.



Providing hydration to large quantity crickets is best done through placing carrots and veggie scraps on top of the egg crates, this stops the moisture from the veggies getting into the high protein food source and creating mould that can be harmful to the insects and the reptiles. There are many other methods to providing hydrations to crickets like fibrous wicks in takeaway containers that allow them to suck the water up without drowning in the water, as crickets are hopeless swimmers and often drown in the smallest volumes of water.



Lastly providing heat is important too, utilising a clamp lamp and small wattage heat light you can attach this to the top of the tub and direct the heat in. An open top is recommended for much needed ventilation, Crickets can rarely jump high enough to escape tub nor can they climb smooth surfaces of plastic.


Feeder Roaches Care Info

Feeder Roaches Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

How To Maintain Tubs:
Maintaining tubs of feeder roaches and extending the life of them out as far as possible, can easily be achieved without spending huge amounts of money at your local store. With a few key simple steps you can easily extend the life of your feeder roaches by weeks.

Often feeder roaches will die quickly with store bought tubs due to the lack of protein available to them to eat, using high protein products like Insect Booster and Vetafarm Herpagrub you can not only keep them full but you can also gut load them for feeding to you Reptiles and Invertebrates. High quality dry cat and dog biscuits can be used although require to be blended to a powder prior to feeding.

Hydration is a big issue too, and while pieces of fresh carrot slices are provided in the tubs, they do not last long and require to be regularly replaced every few days. You can easily use scrap veggies from each night’s dinner to offer a refreshed hydration source, items like carrot peelings and broccoli stems are great. For a great longer lasting product to use that won’t cost much is Pisces Aquaload, it will last each tub roughly a week and can easily be reused for new tubs, if not totally eaten before your tubs of feeder roaches run out. Aquaload is jam packed with vitamin C and calcium which is great for your insects and even better for your Reptiles and Invertebrates.

Lastly heat can be a huge help as cold feeder roaches often die, they require good heat to stay active and the body working. Placing your feeder roaches over the top of your enclosures or terrariums near the heat source can provide them much needed heat to stay active.

How To Maintain Bulk:
Bulk feeder roaches can be a cost effect way of ordering you feeder roaches for larger collections and easy to maintain. Using a product call Fluon AD-1 applied to the top 2 inches of the inside of your tubs will stop them from being able to escape. This looks like milk when applied but dry’s to a thick chalk like ring. It makes it impossible for you feeder roaches to escape as they can’t grip the walls with it. Other methods can be found online and are highly ineffective and do not last long, these methods are not recommended as after all, the last thing you want in your home is a roach infestation!!

Feeding 1000s of hungry feeder roaches is exactly the same as smaller tubs using products like Insect Booster, Herpagrub and Bulk Insect Feeder Food. This is a must as without this high protein food to eat they can often turn on each other for a food. This creates stress in the within the tub and can lead to devastation as they cannibalise throughout. Most common methods are to place in food dish or scattered throughout the bottom of the tub.

Providing hydration to large quantities of feeder roaches can be a tricky balance as over feeding of carrots and other veggies can lead to a build-up of moist faeces in your tub, this raises the humidity levels with in the tub and will often smell. Reducing the amount of carrots that a tub is provided to what they can all eat within a 6 hour period once a week will remove any unwanted humidity and smell.

Lastly providing heat is important too, utilising a clamp lamp and small wattage heat light you can attach this to the top of the tub and direct the heat in. An open top is recommended for much needed ventilation. Feeder roaches do not need anything else for breeding as they multiply very fast and a good size healthy colony can maintain a large quantity of Reptiles without issues.

Sorting sizes is easily done with varying size holes in multiple tubs, 3mm and 5mm holes drilled in the base of a tub with a ring of Fluon on the top inside of each tub and on the base around the outside. This stops roaches climbing up and out and down and back over into the tub.

Bearded Dragon Care Info

Bearded Dragon Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

General Overview:
Bearded Dragons are a great pet for not only the first time enthusiast but also great for the young ones. They are found in semi-arid regions of Australia and get to 60cm in size and up to 500Gs.

They come in a wide variety of colours here in Australia including bright reds, yellow, oranges and even small amounts of blues. They also come in darker colours like greys and blacks. Mutations in Bearded Dragons here in Australia include Leatherback, Silkback, Hypomelanistic, Translucent, Dunner, Other mutations that can be found (although rare and hard to find) are Zeros and Paradox.

Food:
Bearded Dragons while young eat predominantly live protein based foods with small amounts of salads, whereas when they are fully grown prefer to eat the opposite eating more salads then live protein based foods.

Live food that are appropriate for Beaded Dragons include the following;
Superworms – Woodies – Crickets – Earthworms – Black Soldier Fly Larvae – Silkworms
Locus – Mealworms.

Salads and fruits that are appropriate for Beaded Dragons include the following;
Bok Choy – Endive – Cabbage – Carrot – Kale – Pumpkin – Zucchini – Celery – Cucumber – Mustard Greens - Apples – Strawberries – Seedless Grapes – Mango – Blackberries.

Water:
Water is very important to Beaded Dragons not only for hydration but to soak in because soaking in water aids the bearded dragon in shedding. A bowl of water should be provided at all times with a general rule of thumb 2/3 the size of the bearded dragon and no deeper than the top of the shoulders.

Housing:
Housing for bearded dragons can be done extremely affordable with the booming popularity of reptiles the businesses around supply are growing also. Enclosures and Terrariums can be found just about in any pet store or online for custom builds. Ideal Enclosure sizes are 3ftx2ftx2ft minimum and recommended for 4ftx2ftx2ft.

Bearded Dragons can be kept on a variety of substrates with sand being the most popular however you can use cheaper alternatives like newspaper and butchers paper. Other methods used for flooring are tiles and pavers however can make the enclosure extremely heavy and harder to clean.

Bearded dragons should be housed separately at all time unless for breeding and should never be left together permanently, there are many keepers that do but it’s at a high risk of serious injury. Adult Bearded Dragons should never be housed with any hatchlings or juveniles as the risk of it eating the young is near 100%.

Heating & Lighting:
Heating can be done in a variety of ways and a thermostat is highly recommended to prevent overheating of your reptile. Using a bright daylight heat light and a compact spiral type UVB light or tube style light with a 10.0UVI rating or with a Mercury Vapour Bulb (heat and UVB in one globe). Mercury Vapour Bulbs can’t be run off Thermostats. Ideal temperatures for a Bearded Dragon is 32c with a basking spot of 40-45c and can even go as high and 50c.

Cleaning:
Cleaning can be super easy with regular spot check to remove daily waste, with the use of a Sand Scoop you can sift through the sand to take out the waste easily. With tiles and other hard substrate choices its recommended to take them out scrub down with mild soap and soak in F10 prior to putting back into the enclosure or terrarium.

Sexing:
Although there are any real sexual dimorphic differences in bearded dragons, sexing can be done with a visual inspection of the tail base. With slightly bending up the tail you can see the two hemipene bulges for a male and lack of for females. Another method used is candling the base of the tail in a dark room to see the presence of Hemipenes for males.

Mating:
Mating is carried out from the end of Aug though to November, the male should be placed in with female for breeding and once finished removed. Males can be fairly aggressive in the mating prcess and can harm the dragons legs and neck area from biting.

Once the female is gravid and becoming ready to lay her eggs, a deep container should be placed in the enclosure to allow her to dig a hole to bury her eggs. She will lay 2-5 times in a season and an increase in calcium high foods is recomemnded during this time. Once she has layed her eggs removed them and put in the incubator with either a medium mix of Vermiculite at 60G and cooled boiled water at 40G or use Perlite and add a few tablespoons of water.

Centipede Care Info

Centipede Care Info

By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates


General Overview:
Centipedes come in a variety of colours ranging from black and dark browns to bright yellows, red, blue and oranges. They come in a variety of sizes in ranging from 20mm as to 20cm as adults depending on species. Keeping is very basic with very little requirements. They often grow fast and mature quickly living for up to 6 years.



Food:
Centipedes can eat a wide variety of insects that can be found readily online and at all good stores. Insects such as crickets, woodies, superworms, mealworms and black soldier fly larvae. Centipedes will even take on protein items like rats and mice and even day old quails however should be offered rarely and as a treat.



Water:
Centipedes can benefit from a small water dish with tiny fish pebbles to the water level or alternatively we recommend misting one of the walls of the enclosure for them to drink from. You may never see your centipede drink as 90% of what they require, they will get from food they eat.



Housing:
Housing can be done as cost effective as $20.00 all the way through to a few hundred dollars depending on how elaborate you are wanting to go. We find here that plastic containers such as Sistema and others found at Bunnings work extremely well. These can be setup in a variety of ways, we here use a substrate mix of 20% Sand (Washed Play Sand from Bunnings) and 80% Coco Peat (Also found at Bunnings). Using small branches or pieces of drift wood make great hides for them to dig under. A thin layer of leaf litter over the surface of the substrate works well to hold in humidity and gives a foraging layer to the centipede.



Cleaning:
Centipedes require very little cleaning, as long as their food scraps and any uneaten dead insects are removed there’s no real need to clean their terrariums often. Removing all the protein foods like rats and mice once the centipede has finished is recommended and should not be left overnight to eat. Cleaning items such as fake plants, hides and water dishes, clean fresh water should be used to soak and clean the items lightly rubbing off any dirt or faeces. 



Heating:
Heating is not required for Centipedes but can be used through winter if desired. A thermostat is best to be used on a 5W heat mat to regulate to a 20c Temperature gradient.



Handling:
Although there are 100s of handling photos and videos online of keepers handling centipedes it is highly discouraged and not recommended. Centipedes have an extremely painful bite that can last a few days.

Sexing:
Centipedes can be extremely hard to sex due to the location of the organs being in a small pocket at the very back of the body between the hind legs. With the aggressive nature of centipedes attempting to pop or sex centipedes a not recommended as the likely hood of a bite is high, also the risk of damaging not only the body structure, rear legs and organ pocket of the centipede.


Mating:
If your centipedes are kept in a communal setup and breed the female will make a nest where she will lay her eggs and wrap around them to protect them, She can eat them if the environment is stressful or the eggs are not viable however. If they are viable the eggs will hatch in one to two months, and the young will molt many times before leaving her.

Funnel-Web Spider Care Info

Funnel-Web Spider Care Sheet


By James Bindoff Reptiles & Invertebrates

General Overview:
Funnel-Web Spiders over all are an amazing spider to keep however are not recommended for first time keeper, they are highly venomous and can be extremely aggressive and territorial.



Housing:
Housing can be done in a variety of ways from basic plastic tubs to all out glass enclosures with fake plants and hides. When designing and building your enclosure for your Funnel-Web Spider there’s a few key points that should considered; Access to the enclosure, cleaning of the enclosure and feeding. This is important as you want to have safe access to the enclosure to minimise the risk to you from the Spider.



The easiest way to set up your Funnel-Web Spider enclosure is to have 2-3 inches of soil with a nice hollow log and some fake plants in there. That way the fake plants can be removed easily for cleaning if required and same for the hollow log. Best substrate to use is Coco Peat substrate 70% with a sand mixed through at 30% rate. 



For Southern Tree Dwelling Funnel-Web Spiders is recommended to use a few rolled tubes of Paper-bark tree for them to hide in. these can be sourced locally in most parklands and sould be rolled fresh then baked in the oven for 45 minutes at 100c.



Cleaning:
Cleaning is very important to reduce waste and any dead uneaten food scraps left by your Funnel-Web Spider. When cleaning out your enclosure it’s always recommended and a must that you use tongs to do the cleaning, Funnel-Web Spiders have a tendency to lung out at things passing their burrows including hands and fingers. You should also when doing a full substrate change ( done every 6-12 months or when needed) is to remove the Funnel-Web Spider to a safe holding container, this removes all risk to you while cleaning the enclosure.





Heating:
Funnel-Web Spider are found in cool climates of Sydney and Central Coast NSW where temperatures can get as low as -4c, However they are often burrowed deep into the ground during these temperatures. If you wish to use a heat source a heat mat is generally peoples choices for this run off a thermostat set to 24-26c.



Handling:
Handling is strongly advised against, Due to their highly toxic venom and aggression bites from Funnel-Web Spiders is an immediate Hospital trip. Seek guidance from the St Johns website for bandaging and First Aid protocol.





Sexing:
Sexing is similar to Tarantulas were males have red bulbs in their Pedipalps. These can be seen but using a soft paint brush to get a threat pose and carefully observing the pedipalps.



Mating:
Is done the same as Tarantulas were you introduce the male into the females enclosure. The male will coax out the female using pheromones and taping of the Pedipalps, he will the reach under and insert his sperm and then leave. Matings should be watched carefully as females can attack the male so having a solf paint brush and a blocking plate handy is recommended.